May 12, 2014; Montreal, Quebec, CAN; Boston Bruins left wing Milan Lucic (17) skates with the puck against Montreal Canadiens during the second period in the game six of the second round of the 2014 Stanley Cup Playoffs at Bell Centre. Mandatory Credit: Jean-Yves Ahern-USA TODAY Sports

Did Sore Loser Milan Lucic Go Too Far In The Handshake Line?

It is a tradition like no other in pro sports.  The handshake line following a hard-fought series that usually, at some point in the course of between 4 and 7 games, had some bad blood.  It is a sign of sportsmanship that neither team really wants to do at the time, but they do it anyway.  One team is absolutely dejected at seeing their dream of hoisting the Stanly Cup ended for another year moments before, while the other team just wants to get to the dressing room, celebrate with their teammates and get on to the next challenge, their goal one step closer.

However, they do it anyway, and 99.9% of the time it is a genuine sign of respect.

Then there is the other 0.1%.  The ones that put a black mark on the otherwise celebrated sign of respect.

Perhaps the most famous one was the Sean Avery-Martin Brodeur snub following the infamous incident where Avery was blocking Brodeur’s view of the play while facing him and waving his arms in front of Brodeur’s face.   Brodeur simply snubbed Avery in the handshake line.

But Wednesday night in Boston, it appears Milan Lucic went a little too far.  Cameras caught a couple of exchanges between Lucic and Montreal Canadiens’ players most notably Dale Weise and Alexei Emelin.  You might remember Weise mocking Lucic’s bicep pose during a scrum in game 6, something that Lucic didn’t take too kindly to.

Weise, according to various news outlets claimed that Lucic said “I’m going to [expletive deleted] kill you next year”.

So, did he go to far with the threat, or should, as Lucic claimed afterward, what was said on the ice stay on the ice?

 

 

 

Tags: Bruins Dale Weise Habs Handshake Milan Lucic NHL Playoffs

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