The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly - A History Of Ottawa Senators Trades

Use your ← → (arrows) to browse

Mar 2, 2014; Vancouver, British Columbia, CAN; Ottawa Senators goalie Craig Anderson (41) covers the puck against the Vancouver Canucks during the second period in the Heritage Classic hockey game at BC Place. Mandatory Credit: Anne-Marie Sorvin-USA TODAY Sports

Well folks, it’s finally here: the NHL Trade Deadline. It’s just like Christmas for every blogger, analyst, and depending on the moves your team makes, maybe for you too. Sens fans know that Bryan Murray likes making a move around the trade deadline, however underwhelming it may be. While Murray isn’t one for blockbuster deals – or really anything that could be considered big – he’s been talking to his nephew, Tim, over in Buffalo about a possible deal. The two names that keep popping up are Chris Stewart and Matt Moulson. Although Sportsnet’s Doug MacLean said that the Senators are out of the Moulson sweepstakes, he probably just wants to make some room to link Moulson to the Leafs. If it wasn’t him, we all know TSN’s Darren Dreger would have done it.

But we’re not here to talk about how the Leafs will pursue Steven Stamkos (that’s not still a thing, is it?). We’re here for a trip down memory lane, a quick look back at some of our favourite trades, and some we would like to forget.

What better way to start than by looking back at a few trades made around the deadline. I only chose a few because these really are the only moves that affect the current team. We all know acquiring Mike Comrie back in 2007 was a great move, as was getting Matt Cullen in 2010, but where are they now? Cullen is still old and playing for the Nashville Predators, and Comrie isn’t married to Hilary Duff anymore. We’re doing alright.

DEADLINE DEALS

(March 4 2009)

Blue Jackets acquire: Antoine Vermette

Senators acquire: Pascal Leclaire, 2009 2nd round pick (Robin Lehner)

If it weren’t for that draft pick, it’s safe to say this deal could have been disastrous for the Sens. After the trade, Vermette found success in Columbus, including a 27 goal, 65 point season. Meanwhile, Pascal Leclaire was injured for the most part. Both from playing and getting hit in the face with the puck while sitting on the bench. This deal can’t be put into a “good” or “bad” category just yet as we haven’t quite seen enough of Lehner. But from what he’s shown, it looks like the Sens got their solid goalie in that trade, though it wasn’t who they expected it to be.

(Feb 18 2011)

Avalanche acquire: Brian Elliott

Senators acquire: Craig Anderson

A good old fashioned player swap. Both of these goaltenders were struggling, and I guess management on both sides thought that a change of scenery would help them out. And it did. Brian Elliott would go on to set the record for save percentage and goals against average in 2011-12, as well as appearing in his first all-star game. Craig Anderson would set the record for save percentage the following year, beating Elliott’s percentage by 0.1%.

(Feb 26 2012)

Blues acquire: 2013 2nd round pick (Thomas Vannelli)

Senators acquire: Ben Bishop

Wow. In all three deadline trades I chose, a goalie has come to Ottawa. I don’t think we’ll see any goalies coming to town this year though. Why is this one on the list? Just because of how great Bishop was in his single season with the Sens, and because it only took a second round pick to get him. The only problem the Sens had with him was the issue of having too many good goalies.

Before we look back on some trades that made us happy, lets relive a few tough ones. Luckily, there haven’t been a whole lot of bad trades by the Senators. You’ll hear about bad trading in the 90′s, but it was really just a bunch of underwhelming deals. Nothing that really made either team involved that much better. Add that to some mediocre drafting, and it’s no wonder it took the Sens a few years to make the playoffs.

Here are a few trades that didn’t go so well:

Use your ← → (arrows) to browse

Tags: NHL Ottawa Senators Trade Deadline 2014

comments powered by Disqus